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of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show us in a very positive way. from my perspective, it's important for us to keep on pushing data sets that allow us to deal with the sometimes imperfections in city government. to figure it out, where it is we need to take risks, we are we can be more entrepreneurial, where we can be more transparent and frank little more accountable to all of you as the residents and as our customers here in city government. and this is why i am proud tomorrow to help move forward legislation that my staff has been working closely with jay nath and mayor leon that will real i do three things. first of all, it will create a chief data officer because we need one person who is responsible and accountable for moving forward our open data agenda. secondly, we're going to require every department in the city to have a representative who is responsible for data so you can go to our transit agency, our police d
but for a $500 fibromyalgiav. i protionx posed to the public if your community can help us figure out an app so if i provided my cell phone to city government, we can let you know if the street cleaning is going to happen tomorrow. we propose this had last year. mayor lee was supportive. we're still waiting for it to happen, idea number one. idea number two, my constituents ask me can you tell us where every single dollar in city government goes? whether it goes to an individual, nonprofit, someone providing goods and services in our city? last year i proposed an open budget application so that we could drill down and know where every single penny of city government is being spent. i want to thank our budget director who is here, our city controller. we are working on this, but we are still months away from getting the data that we need to provide this information to you. my third idea, i want to thank our rec and park department. you're going to be hearing a little bit from the director of that department, phil ginsberg about the new application they have helped us with. i'm very proud of what
is focused on how do we make government more efficient, how do we make it more effective, and how do we use information to make better decisions. and i think that's why the mayor has asked that the chief data officer sit in my office. so that they have access to financial information as well as a team of people who are already inclined to work on analytical problems. so, as the mayor and board president chiu indicated we'll be hiring a chief data officer looking for the best and brightest people. so, if you know of people or if you yourself are interested, i'd love to talk to you, so, find me after. the role of this person is to figure out how do we build on what we've already done in terms of open data, how do we make government more transparent, what kinds of standards are needed to make sure that data is accessible both within the city, between agencies and also to the private sector and the public. and i think that this person, this data officer really will help us do what many of you in the private sector are already doing well, which is using that information to make better decisions.
million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations t
in use it to helping people in need. first of all, i want to say that there is a special thing about this plasticity as it relates to ourselves. that is to say it is constructed on the basis of moment to moment association of things that go together or the things that are expected to occur in the next moment in time. one thing that always goes with everything we feel, everything we do, every act we have had, every thought is a reference to the actor, to the player, to the doer, and that references to ourself. all of that derives massive plastic self-reference. we have to construct and enrich a strongly center itself, a person, in our brain through its changing itself in a powerful, plastic way. we're also constructed through these same processes to attach to the other people, to the other things we are close to in life. that is the basis of the attachment of the mother to the child or the child to the mother. through millions of the events of contact and interaction, all of those counts in ways that actually grow the child into the person that is the mother. we are constructed to bui
project is allowing us to do that recorrection. and this area is not splintered off. >> and we can see how dramatic a change it will be when doyle drive is suppressd and you have a cover that connects the cemetery to this project. it's historic on the statewide and national basis, but you could rush the project or put thought and time to create something of lasting public benefit. >> we really want this, for everyone to feel like it's a win situation. whether you are a neighbor that lives nearby or a commuter or user of the park. that everyone will experience a much better situation than they currently have. >> the human interest to me is how people could work out so many challenging differences to come to a design that we believe will give us a jewel. landmark of a place. >> i am sure it will have refining effect like embark did. and there were people about that and no one would think of that today. and when you look at growth and transformation of the embark, the same with doyle. it will be a cherished part of the city and a worthy addition to what is there. >> it will be a safe and beau
the contributions of folks while they're still with us. so, the lifetime achievement award is for someone we feel we should take this moment in time and thank in person for their contributions to the city. and i think we have this year's winner epitomizes the kind of person that we should take the time to acknowledge and to go further into that i'd like to actually take a moment and invite now our supervisor district 8 malia cohen who would like to share her opening thoughts on this award. (applause) >> can i just tell you how good it feels to be up here, to look out to see all the people that make everything possible, that really makes san francisco wonderful? and i just have got to give a special shout out. you knew i grew up in the portola for those that don't know. [cheering and applauding] >> right there at the intersection of silly man and colby, my parents still live there. that's where it started for me. but tonight is a night that we have abopportunity * to up lift and support and say thank you to all the people that certainly provide me support and provide me the motivation to get up and
facing the city. welcome. thank you for joining us today. tell us about your background, where you grew up, went to school, and what kind of jobs to have had. >> i grew up in the philadelphia area, in new jersey. i went to school up and down the east coast. i went to undergrad at duke university. i went to law school at harvard. after clerking for a judge, i came out here in 1997. i have been here for the last 14 years. i have always lived in the castro. i am an attorney. i started out in private practice. i settle private law firm during complex commercial litigation. in 2002, and moved over to the sentences the city attorney's office where i worked on the trial team doing trials for the city, handling my own cases, and supervising a team of attorneys as well. >> why did you choose to live in san francisco? >> i always assumed i would go back to the philadelphia area since that is where my family is. i was always interested in san francisco in terms of what it is as a city, its culture, it's amazing lgbt community. i came out here for a summer, fell in love with it. i have been interes
, the survey works and what the survey results would be used for. >> okay. commissioner wynns could we have a report from the budget and service meeting of february 6th. >> yes, thank you, the committee met and we reviewed kind of the as we do routinely administratively approved. >> excuse me one second. i am sorry, could we take the conversation outside please? there has been a request to keep the conversation outside, please? thank you. >> you may continue. >> and honestly explaining the process for the benefit of commissioner haney which is good for all of us to review that, i appreciate it. >> but mainly we talked about the update on the state budget. we all believe and hope that the state budget with the passage of prop 30 and the beginning of the rebounding of the economy in california, will continue to be significantly better than we anticipated it might be for next year and the coming years. so we have some new projections about the or about our anticipated balances and did all of the members of the board get those? >> yes? >> so you all received them? i think that we should after t
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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